Track your portfolio with Rebo

ReboNavI’m delighted to announce that Rebo, the portfolio management app for UK investors I’ve been working on (with my new business partner – James) is now live and ready to be used by the general public.

If you live in the UK and manage your own portfolio, I’d urge you to go and try it out – there’s no charge to use it.

The app is still in what I would consider a ‘beta’ state and there’s lots of work to be done to turn it in to the ‘go-to’ tool for portfolio/asset allocation tracking, but it already solves a couple of the biggest problems I personally had with my spreadsheet-based portfolio tracking methodology.

Automatic price retrieval

Once you’ve told Rebo what assets you hold in your portfolio, you will never again have to manually retrieve prices for them. When you log in to the app, it will display up-to-date prices for everything that you own.

If you buy more of a particular security, just edit the number of units you hold like so:

UpdateUnitsHeld

and Rebo will do the rest.

Investment accounts all in one place

The Accounts page in Rebo gathers together all of your investment accounts and wrappers on a single page giving a user-friendly view of which assets are held in each account and how much of each you hold:

AccountsScreen

Asset allocation

My main inspiration for embarking upon the Rebo project was the desire to simplify the management of my portfolio’s asset allocation.

At the moment, if you tell the app what you own, it will automatically keep track of the current state of your asset allocation and draw you a nice pie chart like this:

AssetAllocation

We have plans to add more advanced asset allocation features in the very near future such as

  • automated rebalancing alerts
  • a ‘What should I buy/sell?’ calculator

Multi-person portfolios

I manage investments for my wife (in addition to my own). My monthly financial review flow chart involves a step to monitor the proportions of our joint portfolio owned by each of us (I like to keep ownership as close to 50:50 as possible).

Rebo now keeps track of that for me, and draws me an ownership pie chart. So, if my investments tank and my wife’s do well, our next contribution to the portfolio will be tilted in favour of my accounts!

Platforms and tax wrappers

I’m really interested in the idea of FIRE (Financial Indepenedence, Retiring Early) so the management of tax wrappers (e.g. SIPPs and ISAs) is very important. I need to make sure that we’re not diverting too much of our new money into pensions when we’ll need healthy ISA and taxable account balances to draw down between the ages of, say 50 and 58.

For this reason, Rebo has been designed to also display how your portfolio is allocated to different platforms/tax wrappers. Again, I’ve gone for the pie chart view:

Wrappers

Wish list

As things currently stand, the next big developments in Rebo are likely to be

  • Monitoring what happens to the portfolio over time (tracking value, contributions and investment performance)
  • Generation of rebalancing trigger emails
  • Projections/planning/progress tracking features

However, we’re really keen to know if we’re on the right track so don’t hesitate to let us know what we need to do to make Rebo perfect for you. What features are missing? Are we missing any funds you’d like the software to track?

Just get in touch with us at hello <–atsign–> reboapp dot co dot uk with your feedback.

Thanks for checking it out!

Andy (and James!).

15 thoughts on “Track your portfolio with Rebo

  1. Interesting project, and I can definitely see it scratching an itch for me. Few things that i’d need for it to be really useful:

    – more funds! Sure I won’t be the only one, but although entering my ISA was fine (all Vanguard), I couldn’t enter much for my SIPP, which is mostly iShares ETFs. Nothing fancy here, SWDA, EMIM, CSP1, IGLT, and SLXX.

    – and as a minor nit, some ETFs list their code in the title (e.g. VWRL) while others don’t (e.g. VFEM). Acc / Inc and Hedged / Unhedged would be useful too.

    – some way of entering non-standard funds. I have two company DC pensions totalling about £300k (with L&G and Fidelity) that contain things like “Company X world tracker fund” or “Company Y bond fund”. These aren’t on any open market list, but I know the underlying funds and asset allocation (e.g. the second one is a blend of three standard bond tracers within one wrapper). Perhaps a set of ‘generic’ funds for now? And Company Pension might be a useful account type.

    – more detailed breakdown for asset allocation. Equities / bonds is a useful view, but would really like the total allocation broken down at least by region, e.g. US Equities, or EM. Getting a snapshot of total asset allocation would be really useful. Right now it’s work of many spreadsheets to work out my US exposure, for example. Being able to see it in one place would be great.

    – most (all?) funds have a 1 – 7 risk rating against them, so would be nice to see a breakdown by this too

    – Costs? Would be good to see platform and fund costs together? And maybe options for switching to cheaper equivalent funds / ETFs?

    – Duration or similar for bond funds? If available?

    As an aside, ownership isn’t particularly useful for me, but can see why it would be to some people (and appreciate that you explain why it’s useful to you in the blog post).

    Hope some of that’s useful. Interesting project, and will watch it develop – let me know if there’s any way I can help.

    B.

    1. Thanks for this incredibly detailed comment Ben.

      Most of your suggestions are already in the ‘to be prioritised when we know what everybody wants’ list. However, the bond duration and risk rating suggestions are new and really interesting.

      Current top priorities can be summarised as ‘getting more securities into it’ and ‘allowing people to add arbitrary/non-standard things’.

      Feel free to keep throwing suggestions at us. Would you be open to having a Skype chat or similar at some point?

      Re ownership breakdown: I’d imagine we’ll make that bit ‘turn off and on-able’ at some point as I appreciate that not everybody runs finances for the entire family.

      Thanks again for your contribution.

  2. Hi Andy thanks for this, simple and straightforward i like that (well the interface is I’m sure your hard work isn’t), I appreciate its a portfolio tracking app but would it be appropriate stretch to include deposit accounts like raisin or bank ie more of a total financial view? Echo the include company pension, could company share schemes be included as an account? I would be happy with the use of “Generic ” for Bank or Company etc for accounts to save on the multiple providers you would otherwise have to include as pull downs/look ups. I’ve input some of my portfolio and will wait patiently whilst you add more ETF’s and funds (making my current cash position look even worse). Thanks again makes part of my life easier although will continue with laborious spreadsheets for historical context and planning until your ambitions for your app replace them 🙂

    1. Hi Jim.

      Thanks for taking the time to comment and give some feedback. The company share scheme idea is brilliant – I hadn’t thought of that as a specific thing to track.

      Everything else you mention is ‘on the list’ so to speak. The next couple of months will be about working out what our users prioritise the most in order to put the ‘feature roadmap’ in some sort of sensible order.

      As for patiently waiting for new funds/ETFs to appear:

      1) James started building the securities database up from ~1000 to ~15000 entries this week so you should see a much more comprehensive list soon

      2) If you have specific requests, just ping us an email and we’ll try and add them as a priority

      > Thanks again makes part of my life easier…

      You’re more than welcome. I know it’s a bit basic at the moment but there are 2 very enthusiastic geeks working about 50 hours per week between us on this now so I hope we can make your spreadsheets redundant in the not too distant future!

  3. I just signed up as I am keen to ditch my spreadsheets which currently only track on an individual account not the underlying holdings. They are also not unitised so the addition of new funds skews performance.

    I’ve been through the torturous process of trying to enter the underlying holdings through Morningstar in the past, entering historic purchases, topups, dividend repurchases etc….only to find, late in the process that it failed to retain information on companies which had ceased to exist either through bankruptcy or having being bought out. As that was where most of my portfolio gains and losses had come from – from an historic performance perspective it was of little value. It also didn’t handle stock splits well. My main motivation for doing so was to answer the question: In the past 10 years as an active stock picker, am I doing better than the market or should I just stick to trackers? I guess the morningstar tool and Reboapp are not designed to be “backward looking” – only tracking performance from the point at which the information is entered…if that makes sense?

    I’m keen to get stuck in but I couldn’t find some of my foreign listed stocks. Amazon for example. One other piece of feedback is that the dropdown list for stock selection makes it quite tricky to find a holding.

    I’ll be checking back in regularly.

    Cheers,

    1. Thanks for the feedback Bob.

      > They are also not unitised so the addition of new funds skews performance.

      This is quite near the top of our feature wish list (after we’ve got the basics right of course).

      > … it failed to retain information on companies which had ceased to exist either through bankruptcy or having being bought out.

      This is a really useful bit of information – thank you. I think that, as time goes on, the value in Rebo will come with dealing with these ‘yucky’ little problems in a sensible way.

      > I guess the morningstar tool and Reboapp are not designed to be “backward looking”

      That’s true at the moment, but we will be market driven. If the data is available and there’s a good business case for adding ‘backward-looking’ performance features, we’ll do it. My suspicion is that we’ll end up catering to passive ‘buy and hold’ asset allocation investors, but again, the market may prove my hypothesis to be wrong.

      > I’m keen to get stuck in but I couldn’t find some of my foreign listed stocks. Amazon for example.

      Our first big job is to make the current securities database much more comprehensive. James is most of the way through pulling in another 14,000 securities (current database size is ~1000). We launched early and the content of the database was based on an educated guess of what people were investing in. Now I have loads of feedback from people like you telling me what we’ve missed!

      On that note, if you could let me have a list of specific securities you need us to add, I can push them to the front of the queue.

      > …the dropdown list for stock selection makes it quite tricky to find a holding

      Thanks for this feedback. A couple of other people have said similar things. We’ll be addressing this soon.

      Don’t hesitate to drop us an email at h e l l o < --atsign--> reboapp dot co dot uk with any other feedback you might have.

  4. Interesting project and I will certainly give it a go. I’m interested to understand how you plan to make money from it. Will we see ads in future?

    Several of my (fairly mainstream) funds weren’t recognised when I tried to paste the code number into the drop down which was a bit frustrating.

    Agree with the comments above, mainly much more detail required before the app is of any use frankly. I and the wife have 4 accounts with iWeb which already provides most of the information I need.

    For some reason the valuations produced by your app don’t exactly match those on iWeb. No differentiation between Acc and Inc funds on a couple of mine (vanguard REIT tracker).

    I’m using iPad but no mobile app in the store.

    Good work though. Well done.

    1. Hi Joe. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

      > Interesting project and I will certainly give it a go.

      Thanks. It’s early days but the more people who use it and give us feedback, the better we can make it.

      > I’m interested to understand how you plan to make money from it. Will we see ads in future?

      In my utopia, we’re going to make something which is so useful that people will happily pay a few pounds per month for it (with the possibility of a still useful but less feature-complete version available for free). In reality, we’ll have to see what the market tells us. There are some lines I’m not willing to cross with respect to how our customers’ data is used but advertising and affiliate referrals are possibilities should the ‘make something good and charge a reasonable amount for it’ plan fail to pay off.

      > Several of my (fairly mainstream) funds weren’t recognised when I tried to paste the code number into the drop down which was a bit frustrating.

      As I mentioned above, we launched early and with a limited securities database. Improving this is currently our number 1 priority. If you have a list of specific securities we’re missing, I can make sure they get pushed to the head of the queue for addition.

      > Agree with the comments above, mainly much more detail required before the app is of any use frankly. I and the wife have 4 accounts with iWeb which already provides most of the information I need.

      This is very useful feedback. Thank you. As I’m sure you can appreciate, we wanted to get something minimal into the wild as soon as possible in order to start getting feedback like this. As such, expect the app to improve massively. It would be interesting to hear what the iWeb interface doesn’t do which you would find useful.

      > For some reason the valuations produced by your app don’t exactly match those on iWeb.

      Again, thank you for the feedback. We’ll investigate.

      > I’m using iPad but no mobile app in the store.

      We currently intend to only have the web app which is already designed to be ‘mobile first’ (i.e. optimised to be useable on tablets/smartphones). The reason for this is that we don’t have to duplicate our development efforts whilst there are only two of us working on it (and, in my opinion, the web app experience on tablet is already pretty good).

      > Good work though. Well done.

      Thanks so much for this. It’s very encouraging. I hope we can actually be of use to you in the not-too-distant future.

      Andy

  5. A worthy – but challenging – goal so thank you guys for taking it on!

    Any chance you would consider ‘open sourcing’ the securities/funds dataset? It is a thankless task keeping up to date but a bunch of us hobbyists would probably start using yours if you were committing to maintaining it in any sort of fashion – and would probably help you with mergers/bankruptcies/categorising/etc. If so, e.g. my portfolio tracking tool’s master list on ‘2: asset database’ tab here could be a basis of some sort?
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1f12VM4hdHnCE32q4loW2moU0CNlhOxeuwMX1lx_xOAk/edit#gid=1425475779

    1. Thanks for taking time to comment FvL.

      We’re still undecided as to exactly how we’ll treat the data we’ve got.

      On the one hand, we want to build a really useful tool (probably with an API to allow infinite customisation/spreadsheet integration) that people will pay a small amount for.

      You’re right, it is a thankless task, and this becomes more apparent with every day we spend on the project! This is going to take sustained effort, eventually by a team which is probably more extensive than the 2 co-founders. Obviously, everybody involved must be able to eat, and we must be able to make enough profit to justify the headaches we’re taking on. As such, maintaining a clean, useful open-source dataset isn’t likely to be our top priority. Exposing data via an API which you might have to pay a small amount for on the other hand seems like a more sustainable plan.

      On the other hand, we’ve already found a few examples of problems which could easily be fixed by crowdsourcing. For example, investment trust asset compositions which drift over time. I’ve found a few trusts which are listed on LSE which I can’t easily get up-to-date asset composition data for. Perhaps there’s a ‘quid pro quo’ angle we could use whereby ‘contributors’ could access the data for free in exchange for hand tweaking things if they find errors/omissions.

      Certainly food for thought though. Thanks.

      Thanks also for sharing the spreadsheet – very useful.

  6. Hi guys I think it’s great that you’re making the effort to do this as the uk market still seems to be surprisingly underserved in this area compared to some of the offerings in USA.

    One thing that I’ve looked to find, and couldn’t find anyone offering is tracking of capital gains in taxable accounts to provide automated recommendations on capital gains tax harvesting. It’s got to be doable as companies like betterment do something very similar for loss harvesting.

    If you could get the app to generate reports of taxable gains and say for instance how can I sell stocks to use my 11k annual gains allowance, along with alternative funds you could buy to replace them with a similar asset allocation that would be really valuable and could be that secret sauce that people would pay you for due to the tax savings or would generate. Alternatively for FIRE people you could tell it how much cash flow you need to generate by selling appreciated stock and it would recommend shares that will get there without generating a gain above the allowance.

    Lastly my wife is a us citizen and has personal Capital and the two things we’ve found really useful with that are:

    – the fee analyser which highlighted some very high charges on an old company pension so we could change to cheaper funds;

    – portfolio analyser that looks inside all your funds to see the underlying holdings and then tell you in aggregate across the portfolio not just major asset class but also splits by industry, country, size and things like value tilt

    Good luck and keep up the good work

  7. Where do you get your stock prices from? I’ve been trying to find a reliable but free feed on an off for a while but have so far not found anything useful.

  8. I came across Rebo on savingninja’s blog and am very impressed with it. I’ve never had a way to update my ETFs automatically and at first glance, I think most of the ones I’ve invested in are on your list already so looking forward to updating and saving time from manual updates in the future.

    Keep up the great work.

  9. Hi Andy.

    Seems like a great little (big) project to keep yourself busy with.

    I’ve signed up but not had a play around yet.

    I know this next suggestion is probably not what Rebo is about, but it would be very useful if it could incorporate property investments. So you can enter the property details, mortgage amount etc so that it can automatically adjust the equity each much based on an index like the Halifax house index. That way, I can know as time progresses whether my property allocation is getting too big and maybe consider selling one. At the moment I’m using a crude spreadsheet.

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